Scalise, Trump, Louisiana LIVE

Monday, 16 January 2017 13:20
Jim W. Miller: To Dr. Charles L. Brown, a great contact and friend
 
Rate this item
(0 votes)

finksby Jim W. Miller

We all come across people in our lives who make an indelible impression on us. They could be classmates in high school or college, or men or women we meet at work or even those with whom we share a particular interest such as church or golf. 

 One of those people in my life was Dr. Charles L. Brown Jr., who was the team physician during my ten years in the Saints’ front office. Charlie died Saturday evening at the age of 87, leaving behind a legacy of professionalism and warm memories among those of us who knew him. He was largely unknown to the public, but to those of us fortunate enough to have worked wth him, he was a giant in Saints history.

(Photo: Jim Finks)

Working with orthopedists Ken Saer, Terry Habig and later Tim Finney, Brown headed the team behind the team that worked with trainer Dean Kleinschmidt to assure the best medical care possible for Saints players. Team doctors have been maligned in recent years about ignoring players’ ailments, particularly concussions, if it means losing valuable playing time. “Put a Band-Aid on it” might be a clichéd cure-all in some fantasy world, but not to men like Charlie Brown.

He was big man, standing a few hands over six feet, with a deep, infectious laugh that could brighten anyone’s day. His specialty was oncology, a profession not prone to laughter but to somber expressions of concern for the patient’s condition. But Charlie was a person whose presence was comforting, whether you were chatting on the sidelines at practice or if you were a patient.

He took charge when my boss Jim Finks became ill during the 1993 draft and it was Charlie who told us that Finks, a lifetime smoker, had lung cancer. Charlie designed the treatment protocol, and I remember his optimism several months later when he said Finks was responding so well that he could not detect any cancer. But he was quick to cautioned us that cancer is an insidious and persistent disease. Almost predictably, the cancer reappeared and brought on Finks’ death.

Charlie Brown was respected among his peers and was named NFL Team Doctor of the Year in 1990 by the Professional Athletic Trainers’ Association. An impartial view came from Rob Huizenga, then a team physician for the Oakland Raiders, who described his first meeting with Dr. Brown in his 1994 book “You’re okay. It’s just a bruise.” The scene was the NFL Combine, which met in New Orleans in 1984 and 1986 before moving permanently to Indianapolis.

“Toward the end of the morning, as the influx of new players slowed to a trickle,” Huizenga wrote, “in strode Dr. Charles Brown, the team physician for the New Orleans Saints. A graying man in his mid-fifties, he was tall and thin, with a classic bespectacled professorial look. He was the president of the eighty-or-so-member National Football League Physicians Society, a group of orthopedic surgeons, internists, general surgeons, psychiatrists and even dentists…Dr. Brown had been overseeing the entire health portion of the combine, making sure all the medical and orthopedic exams were going smoothly. He had also been meeting with the NFL hierarchy about ways to stem the use and abuse of drugs and begin an educational program.

"I overheard him making arrangements to go deep into the French Quarter for lunch with a group of similarly distinguished looking team doctors … We caught a couple of cabs to an elegant New Orleans landmark. It had fans overhead, waiters scurrying around, and a very in-looking clientele. I ordered a beer and a shellfish appetizer, and in the next 45 minutes of lunch I learned more about sports medicine than I had in the previous month or two.”

Charlie loved the cuisine of the city, and I last saw him when he called and invited me to have lunch at Lilette’s, a fashionable spot on Magazine Street. We shared fond memories of the coaches and players we had worked with, and then he dispensed a final bit of advice that is as effective as any pill he ever prescribed. “Never lose contact with your contacts,” he said. “It is critical to remain socialized.” Thanks, Charlie, for giving me the honor to have known you.
Jim W. Miller is former Exec. VP of the New Orleans Saints. Visit his blog at JimWMillerSports.com

Last modified on Monday, 16 January 2017 18:39
Media Sources

BayoubuzzSteve

Website: www.bayoubuzz.com
Login to post comments
  • Despite 5th plea, Schiff says House Intelligence Committee pursues Flynn's documents
  • Facebook Live: Discuss harm of Trump budget proposal on Louisiana coastal economy, restoration
  • Governor Edwards welcomes Pence with Medicaid, budget, Louisiana coast wishlist
  • World Premiere tonight in N.O. Bilderberg, the Movie

flynn2Despite General Michael Flynn’s announcement via his counsel that the General and former head of National Security, would take the 5th Amendment in Congressional proceedings, the Intelligence Committee will pursue information, regardless.

Read More

560 usgs land loss map 2The efforts to rebuild the Louisiana coast has suffered a major and immediate setback, assuming that Congress goes along with the most recent budget proposal from President Trump.

Read More

penceToday, Governor John Bel Edwards welcomed Vice President Mike Pence to Louisiana as he Veep is attending a event with top Louisianqa Republican officials. Along with the welcome, however, is a wishlist of requests including an item of recent vinctage involving the current Trump budget which tears a hole into the funding for the Louisiana coastal restoration. 

Read More

bilderbergIt is always an honor when a movie premiere is held in New Orleans and tonight is no exception. At 7:30 p.m. Bilderberg, the Movie will premiere at the historic Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania Street.

Read More

BB Menu

latter-blum2

Sen. Appel talks budget, economy

TRUMP TALK

Dead Pelican

Optimized-DeadPelican2 1 1