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Louisiana Elections 2011: Jindal, GOP Vs. Phone Booth?
  // Tuesday, 04 January 2011 12:02 //

Stephen Sabludowsky, Bayoubuzz PublsiherSummary: Louisiana elections season is now upon us. The state   will get a heavy dose of Louisiana politics, and even moreso if the Louisiana Democrats are able to field a candidate against Governor Bobby Jindal.


The New Year is here in Louisiana politics and before we know it, there will be elections in the air, everywhere.

There will be campaigning for local offices, Lt. Governor, Secretary of State and statewide races.

There will even be an election for Louisiana governor.

Yes, believe it or not, for the Louisiana governor.

Governor Bobby Jindal’s record will be on center stage for the state to decide if he has earned another stay at the mansion.

Some say that much depends upon what occurs during the legislative session. 

There will be teeth gnashing and blood-letting this spring over the worse budget problem in recent Louisiana history.

Unlike the Louisiana elections of 2007 and even 2003, there are a few factors that could come into play as we approach Election Day.

Bobby Jindal has no opponent.

By contrast, in 2003, Jindal faced Kathleen Blanco and a number of well-known candidates for the top seed.

With a real and hot contest at the top of the ballot, there was spicy interest in that and other races across the state.

Again, in 2007, with John Breaux looking at a run and with two candidates with little statewide name recognition but with a lot of cash, John Georges and Walter Boasso, there was little doubt who was going to be the top dog in the primary.  With the additional candidate, Public Service Commissioner, Foster Campbell, a true Democrat, fighting from the left, many thought there would be a runoff.  They were sadly mistaken as Jindal took home all of the marbles without even being forced into a one-on-one second vote.

Yet, again, because there was an election for Louisiana's top political position which received much attention, the other statewide races were also good attractions.   

Back then, we surely had dogfights for positions such as Agriculture commissioner, and Attorney General.  Republican Mike Strain toppled Democrat Bob Odom for the “Ag” seat and Democrat Buddy Caldwell edged out Republican Royal Alexander and incumbent Charles Foti.

My, haven’t things changed?

This year, so far, no big name Louisiana Democrat or even a credible little name “demo” has been seriously mentioned as candidate for the top Louisiana honcho.  Since Jindal has been on a perpetual campaign and now book tour since he took office, he has amassed a very deep treasure chest of campaign gelt.  The only Louisiana Democrat with any real name recognition that could possibly run against Bobby Jindal is Caldwell, however, many are waiting for him to jump the fence into Republican pastures.

If the Louisiana Democratic Party is not dead, it is screaming “I’m falling and I can’t get up”.

One must wonder, whom will the Democrats field against “Jindal The Conqueror”.  Mitch Landrieu?  Mary Landrieu? Charlie Melancon?

No chance.

Now, I am hearing some chuckling—how about Governor Edwin Edwards, now that he will be getting out of jail.

Funny.

The truth is, the Louisiana Democrats have no one to tout and the Louisiana Republican Party essentially has already anointed Jindal as its candidate.  For instance, today, the Louisiana Republican Party sent out an email blast promoting a newspaper article saying nice things about the governor and the economy.

For now, it appears there will be no serious challenge at the top and as a result, the other statewide and local elections will be forced to draw audiences on their own merits.

While it is a little too early to say the party is over for the Louisiana Democrats, it is not too soon to speculate if there are enough Louisiana voters who will vote Democrat to fill a telephone booth, these days.

With Auld Lang Syne now past, with no Louisiana gubernatorial contest on the horizon, the critical signs of life for Louisiana Democrats are barely visible and the old acquaintances of real election contests are for now, forgotten.

Do you agree, or disagree? Talk about this column below on our Buzzbacks and discuss Louisiana politics

   

 

Yes, believe it or not, governor.

Governor Bobby Jindal’s record will be on center stage for the state to decide if he has earned another stay at the mansion.

Some say that much depends upon what occurs during the legislative session. 

There will be teeth gnashing and blood-letting this spring over the worse budget problem in recent Louisiana history.

Unlike the elections of 2007 and even 2003, there are a few factors that could come into play as we approach Election Day.

Bobby Jindal has no opponent.

By contrast, in 2003, Jindal faced Kathleen Blanco and a number of well-known candidates for the top seed.

With a real and hot contest at the top of the ballot, there was spicy interest in that and other races across the state.

Again, in 2007, with John Breaux looking at a run and with two candidates with little statewide name recognition but with a lot of cash, John Georges and Walter Boasso, there was little doubt who was going to be the top dog in the primary.  With the additional candidate, Public Service Commissioner, Foster Campbell, a true Democrat, fighting from the left, many thought there would be a runoff.  They were sadly mistaken as Jindal took home all of the marbles without even being forced into a one-on-one second vote.

Yet, again, because there was an election for the state’s top political position which received much attention, the other statewide races were also good attractions.   

Back then, we surely had dogfights for positions such as Agriculture commissioner, and Attorney General.  Republican Mike Strain toppled Democrat Bob Odom for the “Ag” seat and Democrat Buddy Caldwell edged out Republican Royal Alexander and incumbent Charles Foti.

My, haven’t things changed?

This year, so far, no big name Democrat or even a credible little name “demo” has been seriously mentioned as candidate for the top Louisiana honcho.  Since Jindal has been on a perpetual campaign and now book tour since he took office, he has amassed a very deep treasure chest of campaign gelt.  The only Democrat with any real name recognition that could possibly run against the governor is Caldwell, however, many are waiting for him to jump the fence into Republican pastures.

If the Louisiana Democratic Party is not dead, it is screaming “I’m falling and I can’t get up”.

One must wonder, whom will the Democrats field against “Jindal The Conqueror”.  Mitch Landrieu?  Mary Landrieu? Charlie Melancon?

No chance.

Now, I am hearing some chuckling—how about Governor Edwin Edwards, now that he will be getting out of jail.

Funny.

The truth is, the Democrats have no one to tout and the Louisiana Republican Party essentially has already anointed Jindal as its candidate.  For instance, today, the Party sent out an email blast promoting a newspaper article saying nice things about the governor and the economy.

For now, it appears there will be no serious challenge at the top and as a result, the other statewide and local elections will be forced to draw audiences on their own merits.

While it is a little too early to say the party is over for the Louisiana Democrats, it is not too soon to speculate if there are enough Louisiana voters who will vote Democrat to fill a telephone booth, these days.

With Auld Lang Syne now past, with no gubernatorial contest on the horizon, the critical signs of life for state Democrats are barely visible and the old acquaintances of real election contests are for now, forgotten.

Do you agree, or disagree? Talk about this below on our Buzzbacks

   

 

Yes, believe it or not, governor.

Governor Bobby Jindal’s record will be on center stage for the state to decide if he has earned another stay at the mansion.

Some say that much depends upon what occurs during the legislative session. 

There will be teeth gnashing and blood-letting this spring over the worse budget problem in recent Louisiana history.

Unlike the elections of 2007 and even 2003, there are a few factors that could come into play as we approach Election Day.

Bobby Jindal has no opponent.

By contrast, in 2003, Jindal faced Kathleen Blanco and a number of well-known candidates for the top seed.

With a real and hot contest at the top of the ballot, there was spicy interest in that and other races across the state.

Again, in 2007, with John Breaux looking at a run and with two candidates with little statewide name recognition but with a lot of cash, John Georges and Walter Boasso, there was little doubt who was going to be the top dog in the primary.  With the additional candidate, Public Service Commissioner, Foster Campbell, a true Democrat, fighting from the left, many thought there would be a runoff.  They were sadly mistaken as Jindal took home all of the marbles without even being forced into a one-on-one second vote.

Yet, again, because there was an election for the state’s top political position which received much attention, the other statewide races were also good attractions.   

Back then, we surely had dogfights for positions such as Agriculture commissioner, and Attorney General.  Republican Mike Strain toppled Democrat Bob Odom for the “Ag” seat and Democrat Buddy Caldwell edged out Republican Royal Alexander and incumbent Charles Foti.

My, haven’t things changed?

This year, so far, no big name Democrat or even a credible little name “demo” has been seriously mentioned as candidate for the top Louisiana honcho.  Since Jindal has been on a perpetual campaign and now book tour since he took office, he has amassed a very deep treasure chest of campaign gelt.  The only Democrat with any real name recognition that could possibly run against the governor is Caldwell, however, many are waiting for him to jump the fence into Republican pastures.

If the Louisiana Democratic Party is not dead, it is screaming “I’m falling and I can’t get up”.

One must wonder, whom will the Democrats field against “Jindal The Conqueror”.  Mitch Landrieu?  Mary Landrieu? Charlie Melancon?

No chance.

Now, I am hearing some chuckling—how about Governor Edwin Edwards, now that he will be getting out of jail.

Funny.

The truth is, the Democrats have no one to tout and the Louisiana Republican Party essentially has already anointed Jindal as its candidate.  For instance, today, the Party sent out an email blast promoting a newspaper article saying nice things about the governor and the economy.

For now, it appears there will be no serious challenge at the top and as a result, the other statewide and local elections will be forced to draw audiences on their own merits.

While it is a little too early to say the party is over for the Louisiana Democrats, it is not too soon to speculate if there are enough Louisiana voters who will vote Democrat to fill a telephone booth, these days.

With Auld Lang Syne now past, with no gubernatorial contest on the horizon, the critical signs of life for state Democrats are barely visible and the old acquaintances of real election contests are for now, forgotten.

Do you agree, or disagree? Talk about this below on our Buzzbacks

   

 

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Metairie, Louisiana

Website: www.bayoubuzz.com

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