Friday, 04 February 2011 13:31
Louisiana Business: New Orleans Census, Lawsuit Abuse, Gulf Oil Regulator
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New Orleans Census

 

  • New Orleans is now a smaller city, having lost 118,526 African Americans and 24,101 whites since 2000, while gaining 3,225 Hispanics. 
  • The entire seven-parish metro area is more diverse with an influx of fully 33,500 Hispanics, and 3,000 additional Asian residents.
  • Children under 18 were among the least likely to return after Katrina, representing only 23 percent of the total metro population down from 27 percent in 2000.
  • Housing units have decreased in the most heavily flood-damaged parishes and increased in outlying parishes, while vacant housing units have increased in every parish across the metro.
  • To read more results about data just released by the Census Bureau check out:

    "What Census 2010 reveals about Population and Housing in New Orleans and the Metro Area" at: http://www.gnocdc.org

     

    the non-partisan, legal watchdog group Louisiana Lawsuit Abuse Watch (LLAW) shows. An analysis of just eight Louisiana municipalities identified more than $52 million spent on lawsuits against local governments, including settlements, verdicts and outside counsel from 2006- 2009. 

    To assess the extent of litigation impact on Louisiana’s municipalities and municipal budgets, LLAW surveyed eight of the largest cities and parishes in Louisiana, and found these staggering results:


    To read the complete report, go to www. LLAW.org.

     

    Bloomberg Examines Louisiana’s Laissez-Faire Oil Regulators

     

    During the month of February, visitors to The Grill Room, the Polo Club Lounge or Le Salon at the Windsor Court Hotel will have the opportunity to enter into the Lundi Gras Lounge sweepstakes. The winner of the sweepstakes will receive a reserved section for a party of eight in the Polo Club Lounge with views overlooking Tchoupitoulas for the Orpheus Parade. They will also receive a $500 bar tab to enjoy the parade.

     

     

     

     

    Check out the Bayoubuzz Calendar and Post Your Events

     17th annual Leukemia Event

    Sixteenth Annual Williams Research Center Symposium “Identity, History, Legacy: Free People of Color in Louisiana”

     “In Search of Julien Hudson: Free Artist of Color in Pre–Civil War New Orleans”

     Saturday Night Ballroom

     Women in Media

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