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Louisiana GOP praises Jindal, Villere, Scalise for national leadership

Written by  // Monday, 19 November 2012 09:33 //


Jindal-campaignto the Louisiana GOP via an email blast today, "Louisiana Republicans have gained thee key leadership positions in recent months that will help to redirect the national Republican Party in 2013.


Earlier last week, Governor Bobby Jindal was elected Chairman of the Republican Governors Association. His vocal criticism of the direction of the Party has dominated national news headlines for days. Governor Jindal has said that Republicans must be smarter when engaging with liberal Democrats and appeal to 100% of Americans for their votes.

Last Thursday, Congressman Steve Scalise was elected Chairman of the Republican Study Committee, the group that has been called the "conservative conscience of the House."
In September, Republican Party of Louisiana Chairman Roger Villere was elected Vice Chairman of the Republican National Committee.

“Louisiana Republicans are proud of Governor Jindal, Congressman Scalise and Chairman Villere and look forward to their leadership at the national level," LAGOP Executive Director Jason Dore said.  "These three conservative, pro-life, anti-tax leaders will help to advance Republican policies without compromising on our principles," Dore said. "All three are proven winners and that's what we need at the national level right now. We hope to replicate the victories we have had in Louisiana across the nation."

 

  1. Republican Governors Need More Time to Implement Health Care Law - Daily Political
  2. The LA “fiscal cliff” redux
  3. Bobby Jindal says liking people, keeping conservative principleskeys to expanding GOP tent
  4. Critics say Romney digging deeper hole for party
  5. MSNBC commentator Melissa Harris-Perry takes verbal shots at Jindal

Governor Jindal Governor Scott Walker on Fox News Sunday

n

ding Republican governors take a hard look at what their party needs to do before it faces voters again.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WALLACE: After a disappointing Election Day, it's no surprise Republicans would do some soul-searching. But, what is a surprise is how quickly it's begun and how serious it's gotten.

Joining us to talk about the future of the party, Governor Bobby Jindal of Louisiana, the new chair of the Republican Governors Association, is in his state capitol of Baton Rouge, and from San Diego, Wisconsin, Governor Scott Walker, the new vice chair of the RGA.

Gentlemen, this week, Mitt Romney, in a conference call with big donors, attributed his defeat to President Obama, giving out gifts to minorities and young people. Governor Jindal, you reacted sharply to that. Let's look:

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MITT ROMNEY, R - FORMER PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: What the president -- president's campaign did was focus on certain members of his base coalition, give them extraordinary financial gifts from the government.

GOV. BOBBY JINDAL, R - LA: I absolutely reject that notion, that description. We've got to stop being the stupid party. You know what I mean by that. Certainly, we need to stop making stupid comments.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WALLACE: So, Governor, what was stupid about what Romney said?

JINDAL: Well, two things. First, Governor Romney is an honorable and exceptional man. And I'm proud to have campaigned for him across the country but I absolutely reject what he said. Look, we as the Republican Party have to campaign for every single vote.

If we want people to like us, we have to like them first. And, you don't start to like people by insulting them and saying their votes were bought. We are an aspirational party.

Let the Democratic Party be the party that says demography is destiny, that says we are going to divide people by race, by gender, by class. We as a Republican Party, believe our conservative principles are good for every single voter. It's not just a marketing campaign. It's not just having better PR folks. We're going to go and convince and fight for every single vote, showing them we are the party for the middle class, upward mobility. We don't start winning majorities and winning elections by insulting our voters.

WALLACE: Look, Governor Walker, I want you to take a look at this exit poll from election night. Who is more in touch with people like you? Fifty-three percent said Obama, 43 percent, said Mitt Romney.

Question, how do Republicans convince the middle class that you're looking out for them?

GOV. SCOTT WALKER, R - WISCONSIN: Well, I think you see it in the governorships. We now, in a nation that went for a Democrat for president, you now have 30 states with Republican governors and I think, the trust factor is there. I share the same belief that Bobby mentioned as well, that we need to be a party that doesn't talk about it.

We go out and actively take the message, I think, a winning message, one we won on in each of these states, with the Republican governors. But we take it and we go out to where people are. We've got a message that works for young people, that works for people who come to our country from other countries, and, basically for anyone who wants to live their piece of the American dream.

We have to show that we are serious about reaching out and helping everyone, not just a group here, not just a group there. But, everyone in the country, live their piece of the American dream. And I think that starts with our governors as great messengers.

WALLACE: But, Governor Jindal, what about the debate going on here in Washington, right now, about the fiscal cliff? President Obama says, look, let's extend the Bush tax cuts, lower tax rates for 98 percent of all taxpayers including the middle class, right now. We can -- I'll sign it today. He took out his pen at the news conference and the Republicans saying, no, no, no, we can't do that until we decide what we'll do with the top two percent of taxpayers.

Why wouldn't the middle class voter look at that and say, these guys, the GOP, are all about protecting the rich?

JINDAL: Chris, two things, one, we as a Republican Party need to make it very clear and we're going to make it very clear. We're not the party of big -- big businesses, big banks, big Wall Street, big bailouts.

When it comes to the tax code, we as the Republican Party have to make it very clear -- we are for a lower, flatter, simpler tax code. And you can maintain progressivity, for example, there have been ideas to limit deductions for the wealthy. There have been ideas to get rid of some of these carve-outs. But we need to make it very clear -- we're not the party trying to protect the rich. They can protect themselves.

We are the party that wants growth, pro-growth policies. Let the Democratic Party be the party of growing -- a government growing revenues. We want to grow the private sector and so, that starts with lower, flatter, simpler tax codes. And, again, it can still be progressive. Let's -- there are ideas to get rid of carve-outs, special treatments to limit the deductions to the wealthy.

But here's the second point, when it comes to this fiscal cliff -- I was in Congress, I guarantee, if they just put a Band-Aid on this, we'll be in another fiscal cliff in a few months. We need structural changes, and that could be a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution, super majority vote, before they raise our taxes -- a limit on the growth in government spending so it can't grow faster than the economy or population growth, limiting government spending as a percentage of GDP -- without those structural changes, we're not getting anywhere. This is just kicking the can down the road.

And let's also be clear -- this country doesn't need two liberal or Democratic parties. Yes, we need to show our policies are appealing and work for the middle class, but we don't need to abandon our principles. The country doesn't need two Democratic Parties.

WALLACE: But, Governor Walker -- I mean, look at the optics of it. When the president is holding up his pen and saying, I'll sign extending tax cuts -- lower taxes, which is supposedly a Republican mantra for 98 percent of Americans and the Republicans say not so fast.

Bill Kristol was on this show last week, and he said, you know, it wouldn't kill the Republicans to raise taxes on millionaires a little bit. Is he wrong?

WALKER: Well, I think you look at the contrast between Washington and what's happening in each of our states. The vast majority of us who are new governors two years ago inherit major budget deficits in our states. We balanced those deficits without raising taxes. In fact, the states like Wisconsin, we actually cut taxes over the past two years, and, revenues have gone up.

I think most Americans, not just those in politics, most Americans look at what's happening in Washington and think, they are missing the boat. The economy is a much bigger issue. Don't get me wrong -- I think they need to balance the budget. I think they need to take care of the fiscal issues. But more importantly, we need to get the economy going. We need to get people back to work and, that disproportionately affects the middle class right now and the fact they are talking about anything that might make it worse in the economy I think is a bad sign about what's happening in Washington.

WALLACE: Let's talk briefly, and I have run into a time crunch in a minute, so I'm going to ask you for quick answers on a couple of specific groups. The problems that your party had, on Election Day, with Hispanics, has been well documented -- 71 percent voted for Obama, 27 percent for Romney.    Governor Walker, does your party need to rethink where it stands on the DREAM Act and the whole issue of the 11 million illegals who are in this country?

WALKER: Oh, I think we need to find a way to move forward on this. I think we want more people who want to live the American dream. I mean, this country is based on immigrants. We've got to find a way to welcome all of our immigrants in, all those who want to live that piece of the American dream.

And I think when we do it -- before I was in governor, I was a Washington executive and historically, I won nearly every Hispanic leaning ward in Milwaukee County where I was a county executive. Why? Because I had a message that resonated with everyone. I had help with small business owners, I had help with school choice, with parents who wanted kids to prevail and get the opportunity they deserved.

Those are things we need to be talking about. If we share that message with all the voters, we're going to do better, whether it's the Hispanic voters, whether it's the young voters, whether it's any other voters out there, we'll do well because we've got a message of prosperity and freedom for all.

WALLACE: And, Governor Jindal, let's take a look at unmarried women, who backed Obama by a wide margin. Unmarried woman voted for Obama by a margin of 67 percent to 31 percent.

Governor, you say to Republicans, don't change your principles, modernize. Don't moderate. But, you've got to know during this campaign, the Democrats hammered your party when it came to freedom of choice on abortion, when it came to access to birth control, when it came to funding of Planned Parenthood.

How do you convince unmarried women that you are looking out for them?

JINDAL: Well, Chris, a couple of things. One, I think we can still be true to our principles -- I'm pro-life. I follow the teachings of my church and my faith.

But at the same time, I think we can respect of those that we disagree with us. We don't need to demonize those who disagree with us. We need to respect the fact that others have come to different conclusions based on their own sincerely held beliefs and have a civil debate.

We don't need to demonize -- and we also don't need to be saying stupid things. Look, we had candidates in Indiana and Missouri that said offensive things that only hurt themselves and lost those Senate seats, but also have hurt the Republican Party across the board. So, I think we can be true to our principles. We don't need to pander or change our principles, but at the same time, we can be respectful.

You mentioned something, look, when a majority of voters in this election think the Democratic Party is more likely to cut tax than the middle class and the Republican Party, that shows that we've got a problem not only with single women and middle class voters but voters across the country. That means we've got a serious problem about making sure that voters understand what we as a party stand for, the principles we are pursuing.

And that -- once we get back on track showing we are the party fighting for the middle class, it helps with female voters, Hispanic voters and every voter out there.

WALLACE: And, finally, Governor Walker, we've got less than a minute left. Both of you have decided not to set up state health care exchanges under ObamaCare, but rather to let the feds come in and do it. I guess the question I have, is, would you agree that at this point with the president reelected, ObamaCare is here to stay?

WALKER: Well, it is the law and we made that clear. The difference is, what we pointed out in our states, and I think Bobby feels the same in his, and other governors, including some Democrats, we don't like the options we are given to comply with the law, the state-run partnership or defer to the federal government, the state run option is really state in name only. It still provides all the same stipulations. In fact, Utah, a state that has an exchange can't even go ahead and use their exchange to qualify for the federal program.

So in the end, if it's state in name only, we'd rather have the federal government do it, as much as it pains us, believing in federalism, in the end it is better they do it and not incur the additional potential costs to our taxpayers, that a state-run exchange would expose us to.

WALLACE: Governor Walker, Governor Jindal, we are going to have to leave it there. There is obviously a lot more talk about. We'll have you back to do it. And we'll be tracking where the two of you try to take the party in the coming months.  Thank you, gentlemen.

JINDAL: Thanks, Chris.

WALKER: Thanks, Chris.

WALLACE: Up next, Israel prepares for a possible invasion of Gaza. And, congress investigates the Benghazi terror attack. We'll ask our Sunday group what is at stake for U.S. national security in both areas, when we come right back.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

ding Republican governors take a hard look at what their party needs to do before it faces voters again.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WALLACE: After a disappointing Election Day, it's no surprise Republicans would do some soul-searching. But, what is a surprise is how quickly it's begun and how serious it's gotten.

Joining us to talk about the future of the party, Governor Bobby Jindal of Louisiana, the new chair of the Republican Governors Association, is in his state capitol of Baton Rouge, and from San Diego, Wisconsin, Governor Scott Walker, the new vice chair of the RGA.

Gentlemen, this week, Mitt Romney, in a conference call with big donors, attributed his defeat to President Obama, giving out gifts to minorities and young people. Governor Jindal, you reacted sharply to that. Let's look:

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MITT ROMNEY, R - FORMER PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: What the president -- president's campaign did was focus on certain members of his base coalition, give them extraordinary financial gifts from the government.

GOV. BOBBY JINDAL, R - LA: I absolutely reject that notion, that description. We've got to stop being the stupid party. You know what I mean by that. Certainly, we need to stop making stupid comments.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WALLACE: So, Governor, what was stupid about what Romney said?

JINDAL: Well, two things. First, Governor Romney is an honorable and exceptional man. And I'm proud to have campaigned for him across the country but I absolutely reject what he said. Look, we as the Republican Party have to campaign for every single vote.

If we want people to like us, we have to like them first. And, you don't start to like people by insulting them and saying their votes were bought. We are an aspirational party.

Let the Democratic Party be the party that says demography is destiny, that says we are going to divide people by race, by gender, by class. We as a Republican Party, believe our conservative principles are good for every single voter. It's not just a marketing campaign. It's not just having better PR folks. We're going to go and convince and fight for every single vote, showing them we are the party for the middle class, upward mobility. We don't start winning majorities and winning elections by insulting our voters.

WALLACE: Look, Governor Walker, I want you to take a look at this exit poll from election night. Who is more in touch with people like you? Fifty-three percent said Obama, 43 percent, said Mitt Romney.

Question, how do Republicans convince the middle class that you're looking out for them?

GOV. SCOTT WALKER, R - WISCONSIN: Well, I think you see it in the governorships. We now, in a nation that went for a Democrat for president, you now have 30 states with Republican governors and I think, the trust factor is there. I share the same belief that Bobby mentioned as well, that we need to be a party that doesn't talk about it.

We go out and actively take the message, I think, a winning message, one we won on in each of these states, with the Republican governors. But we take it and we go out to where people are. We've got a message that works for young people, that works for people who come to our country from other countries, and, basically for anyone who wants to live their piece of the American dream.

We have to show that we are serious about reaching out and helping everyone, not just a group here, not just a group there. But, everyone in the country, live their piece of the American dream. And I think that starts with our governors as great messengers.

WALLACE: But, Governor Jindal, what about the debate going on here in Washington, right now, about the fiscal cliff? President Obama says, look, let's extend the Bush tax cuts, lower tax rates for 98 percent of all taxpayers including the middle class, right now. We can -- I'll sign it today. He took out his pen at the news conference and the Republicans saying, no, no, no, we can't do that until we decide what we'll do with the top two percent of taxpayers.

Why wouldn't the middle class voter look at that and say, these guys, the GOP, are all about protecting the rich?

JINDAL: Chris, two things, one, we as a Republican Party need to make it very clear and we're going to make it very clear. We're not the party of big -- big businesses, big banks, big Wall Street, big bailouts.

When it comes to the tax code, we as the Republican Party have to make it very clear -- we are for a lower, flatter, simpler tax code. And you can maintain progressivity, for example, there have been ideas to limit deductions for the wealthy. There have been ideas to get rid of some of these carve-outs. But we need to make it very clear -- we're not the party trying to protect the rich. They can protect themselves.

We are the party that wants growth, pro-growth policies. Let the Democratic Party be the party of growing -- a government growing revenues. We want to grow the private sector and so, that starts with lower, flatter, simpler tax codes. And, again, it can still be progressive. Let's -- there are ideas to get rid of carve-outs, special treatments to limit the deductions to the wealthy.

But here's the second point, when it comes to this fiscal cliff -- I was in Congress, I guarantee, if they just put a Band-Aid on this, we'll be in another fiscal cliff in a few months. We need structural changes, and that could be a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution, super majority vote, before they raise our taxes -- a limit on the growth in government spending so it can't grow faster than the economy or population growth, limiting government spending as a percentage of GDP -- without those structural changes, we're not getting anywhere. This is just kicking the can down the road.

And let's also be clear -- this country doesn't need two liberal or Democratic parties. Yes, we need to show our policies are appealing and work for the middle class, but we don't need to abandon our principles. The country doesn't need two Democratic Parties.

WALLACE: But, Governor Walker -- I mean, look at the optics of it. When the president is holding up his pen and saying, I'll sign extending tax cuts -- lower taxes, which is supposedly a Republican mantra for 98 percent of Americans and the Republicans say not so fast.

Bill Kristol was on this show last week, and he said, you know, it wouldn't kill the Republicans to raise taxes on millionaires a little bit. Is he wrong?

WALKER: Well, I think you look at the contrast between Washington and what's happening in each of our states. The vast majority of us who are new governors two years ago inherit major budget deficits in our states. We balanced those deficits without raising taxes. In fact, the states like Wisconsin, we actually cut taxes over the past two years, and, revenues have gone up.

I think most Americans, not just those in politics, most Americans look at what's happening in Washington and think, they are missing the boat. The economy is a much bigger issue. Don't get me wrong -- I think they need to balance the budget. I think they need to take care of the fiscal issues. But more importantly, we need to get the economy going. We need to get people back to work and, that disproportionately affects the middle class right now and the fact they are talking about anything that might make it worse in the economy I think is a bad sign about what's happening in Washington.

WALLACE: Let's talk briefly, and I have run into a time crunch in a minute, so I'm going to ask you for quick answers on a couple of specific groups. The problems that your party had, on Election Day, with Hispanics, has been well documented -- 71 percent voted for Obama, 27 percent for Romney.    Governor Walker, does your party need to rethink where it stands on the DREAM Act and the whole issue of the 11 million illegals who are in this country?

WALKER: Oh, I think we need to find a way to move forward on this. I think we want more people who want to live the American dream. I mean, this country is based on immigrants. We've got to find a way to welcome all of our immigrants in, all those who want to live that piece of the American dream.

And I think when we do it -- before I was in governor, I was a Washington executive and historically, I won nearly every Hispanic leaning ward in Milwaukee County where I was a county executive. Why? Because I had a message that resonated with everyone. I had help with small business owners, I had help with school choice, with parents who wanted kids to prevail and get the opportunity they deserved.

Those are things we need to be talking about. If we share that message with all the voters, we're going to do better, whether it's the Hispanic voters, whether it's the young voters, whether it's any other voters out there, we'll do well because we've got a message of prosperity and freedom for all.

WALLACE: And, Governor Jindal, let's take a look at unmarried women, who backed Obama by a wide margin. Unmarried woman voted for Obama by a margin of 67 percent to 31 percent.

Governor, you say to Republicans, don't change your principles, modernize. Don't moderate. But, you've got to know during this campaign, the Democrats hammered your party when it came to freedom of choice on abortion, when it came to access to birth control, when it came to funding of Planned Parenthood.

How do you convince unmarried women that you are looking out for them?

JINDAL: Well, Chris, a couple of things. One, I think we can still be true to our principles -- I'm pro-life. I follow the teachings of my church and my faith.

But at the same time, I think we can respect of those that we disagree with us. We don't need to demonize those who disagree with us. We need to respect the fact that others have come to different conclusions based on their own sincerely held beliefs and have a civil debate.

We don't need to demonize -- and we also don't need to be saying stupid things. Look, we had candidates in Indiana and Missouri that said offensive things that only hurt themselves and lost those Senate seats, but also have hurt the Republican Party across the board. So, I think we can be true to our principles. We don't need to pander or change our principles, but at the same time, we can be respectful.

You mentioned something, look, when a majority of voters in this election think the Democratic Party is more likely to cut tax than the middle class and the Republican Party, that shows that we've got a problem not only with single women and middle class voters but voters across the country. That means we've got a serious problem about making sure that voters understand what we as a party stand for, the principles we are pursuing.

And that -- once we get back on track showing we are the party fighting for the middle class, it helps with female voters, Hispanic voters and every voter out there.

WALLACE: And, finally, Governor Walker, we've got less than a minute left. Both of you have decided not to set up state health care exchanges under ObamaCare, but rather to let the feds come in and do it. I guess the question I have, is, would you agree that at this point with the president reelected, ObamaCare is here to stay?

WALKER: Well, it is the law and we made that clear. The difference is, what we pointed out in our states, and I think Bobby feels the same in his, and other governors, including some Democrats, we don't like the options we are given to comply with the law, the state-run partnership or defer to the federal government, the state run option is really state in name only. It still provides all the same stipulations. In fact, Utah, a state that has an exchange can't even go ahead and use their exchange to qualify for the federal program.

So in the end, if it's state in name only, we'd rather have the federal government do it, as much as it pains us, believing in federalism, in the end it is better they do it and not incur the additional potential costs to our taxpayers, that a state-run exchange would expose us to.

WALLACE: Governor Walker, Governor Jindal, we are going to have to leave it there. There is obviously a lot more talk about. We'll have you back to do it. And we'll be tracking where the two of you try to take the party in the coming months.  Thank you, gentlemen.

JINDAL: Thanks, Chris.

WALKER: Thanks, Chris.

WALLACE: Up next, Israel prepares for a possible invasion of Gaza. And, congress investigates the Benghazi terror attack. We'll ask our Sunday group what is at stake for U.S. national security in both areas, when we come right back.

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