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Is the national media parked on Bobby Jindal swapping after tax?
Written by  // Tuesday, 09 April 2013 10:17 //

jindal-parkedIs the national media parked on Bobby Jindal after tax plan debacle?

 

 

Governor Bobby Jindal made local and national news on Monday and it was not pretty.

In his speech to the legislature, Jindal “parked” his unpopular tax plan after making a high-profile pitch to Louisiana and national audiences.

By doing so, numerous publications are reminding readers of his derided opening argument on national TV following President Barack Obama’s State of the Union speech.

His stock plummeted but he has been able to make comebacks.  Now that his popularity is at a embarrassing 37.8% and given the collapse of his tax plan and perhaps his education plan,  the question becomes not only whether he can get back into the good graces on his Louisiana voters but whether he can remain a credible national spokesperson for the Republican Party.

Here is a taste of some of the recent articles from around the nation:

Louisiana politicos were doubtful that Jindal would be able to pull off eliminating the income tax in one fell swoop; it appears they were right. But if he is able to pass a bill that gradually lowers the income tax and then finally eliminates it, he  can point to that as a result achieved.

http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/345090/jindal-wont-pursue-eliminating-income-tax-one-swoop-katrina-trinko
Jindal’s gambit was something like a Louisiana-based ‘Ryan Plan’ designed among other things to be the centerpiece of a possible 2016 campaign for President. And had he been able to get it passed it would have been quite a calling card in the GOP primaries, at least among the economic conservative wing of the party…..


The other point is that this is considerably harder to manage at the state than the federal level since at the state-level, either literally or in practice, you actually have to balance your budget. So if you dramatically cut taxes on wealthy people, you actually have to come up with that money somewhere — either by ramping up taxes on middle income or poor people or by dramatically cutting services, or in this case, by doing both. That’s really unpopular, to put it mildly.

On the federal level, as we saw in 2001, you can just cut taxes dramatically and push the country into big structural deficits. No problem. At the state level, not so simple. As Jindal said, the backlash “certainly wasn’t the reaction I was hoping to hear.” But how could he have expected otherwise?


The other point is that this is considerably harder to manage at the state than the federal level since at the state-level, either literally or in practice, you actually have to balance your budget. So if you dramatically cut taxes on wealthy people, you actually have to come up with that money somewhere — either by ramping up taxes on middle income or poor people or by dramatically cutting services, or in this case, by doing both. That’s really unpopular, to put it mildly.

On the federal level, as we saw in 2001, you can just cut taxes dramatically and push the country into big structural deficits. No problem. At the state level, not so simple. As Jindal said, the backlash “certainly wasn’t the reaction I was hoping to hear.” But how could he have expected otherwise?


The other point is that this is considerably harder to manage at the state than the federal level since at the state-level, either literally or in practice, you actually have to balance your budget. So if you dramatically cut taxes on wealthy people, you actually have to come up with that money somewhere — either by ramping up taxes on middle income or poor people or by dramatically cutting services, or in this case, by doing both. That’s really unpopular, to put it mildly.

On the federal level, as we saw in 2001, you can just cut taxes dramatically and push the country into big structural deficits. No problem. At the state level, not so simple. As Jindal said, the backlash “certainly wasn’t the reaction I was hoping to hear.” But how could he have expected otherwise?

http://editors.talkingpointsmemo.com/archives/2013/04/behind_jindals_fall_2.php

The governor had high hopes for his plan, expected the Republican-run Louisiana state legislature to follow his lead, and thought it could help serve as a platform for a presidential bid. Instead, the public hated the idea, legislators balked, and Jindal was forced to kill his own plan before the legislature did it for him.

Also note, this isn't Jindal's first high-profile failure of the year, either. In late January, the governor pushed a plan to eliminate the state's hospice program for Medicaid recipients, but was forced to abandon that plan, too, in the face of public revulsion.

http://maddowblog.msnbc.com/_news/2013/04/09/17670892-jindal-scraps-regressive-tax-plan?lite

The governor says the change would attract business by making Louisiana competitive with states such as oil-rich neighbor Texas, which has no income tax.

Eliminating income taxes would also be an attention-getting accomplishment for a Republican governor with national aspirations. Jindal's tax proposal has won praise from national conservatives such as Grover Norquist, the Washington, D.C.-based guru of anti-tax advocates who asks politicians to pledge never to raise taxes.

However, local skeptics have raised concerns that the sales tax increase would disproportionately hit poor residents, increase costs for businesses, hurt New Orleans' tourism industry and make it harder for local taxes to be imposed.



http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/jindal-delays-tax-plan/2013/04/09/id/498527#ixzz2PycfW180 

Probably a wise move, for the moment — he acknowledged that the support for his plan just wasn’t there, and his state approval rate has seen an accompanying slide — but now he can take up the mantle of a conservative leader who came out swinging with a bold plan and catalyzed a tough conversation, instead of governing with weaksauce pandering. A big win on this type of issue would have made a spectacular issue for, oh, say, a 2016 presidential run maybe, but even if any final results aren’t nearly as ambitious as he’d hoped, he’ll still be able to say that he spurred Louisiana into action and garnered some bipartisan accomplishments. Let’s see where this goes.


http://hotair.com/archives/2013/04/08/jindal-backs-off-of-his-tax-reform-plan-lets-work-together/

Whatever happens with Louisiana’s income tax, let’s remember that Bobby Jindal’s initial plan was too far, too fast for the state’s Republican legislature. Recognizing a defeat was coming and pulling the proposal doesn’t make him some kind of sensible moderate.

http://hotspyer.com/2013/04/09/louisiana-gov-bobby-jindal-surrenders-partially-on-terrible-tax-plan/

 

 

              

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