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THE PACE TO RACE
Sunday, 20 April 2014 18:01

After months of training, Leo Verde woke up April 15, 2013, in Boston to just the kind of day he’d hoped for. The weather was beautiful and the temperatures were in the 40s, lovely cool weather in which to run 26 miles.

“It was always a dream of mine to run Boston,” Baton Rouge resident Verde said of last year’s marathon. “Boston. It’s something about that romanticism about Boston. The history.”

At the age of 49, he knew he was too old to make the qualifying time.

Published in Baton Rouge News
Raw milk comes to table
Sunday, 20 April 2014 18:01

In a state that nurtures young chefs and generally exalts eating, Louisiana has been slow to adopt the national trend toward local and organic food.

That’s not to say farmers’ markets are not popular.

From Main Street in Baton Rouge to Magazine Street in New Orleans, and from Foreman Street in Lafayette to Covington, Slidell and Gretna, community markets are crowded on Saturday mornings with people buying fresh, locally grown vegetables, fruits, meats and seafoods, usually produced and sold by the farmer and his family.

Published in Baton Rouge News
Some charters explore teachers unions
Sunday, 20 April 2014 18:00

“We’re not out here trying to get rich. Many of us feel like this is a mission in life, to teach young people, to help society be a better place.” Mark Quirk, Benjamin Franklin High School teacher

Mark Quirk is like a lot of veteran teachers in New Orleans. He thinks of his job as more of a calling than a career, has watched the growing emphasis on test scores with dismay and worries that teachers have lost important rights concerning pay and job security in the privately run charter schools that have taken over public education in New Orleans.

Published in New Orleans News

“When you start here, you know it’s going to be a long run. How many people retire from here? Not many. They usually work here until they die.” Bryant Sylvester, 27-year veteran of Galatoire’s Restaurant

In 1973, Imre Szalai was just learning the ropes at Galatoire’s Restaurant. The recent immigrant from Hungary was just learning English, too. So he was grateful when a fellow waiter gave him some advice about how to address a table of customers.

Published in New Orleans News

Anna Brimmer didn’t know she’d have to pay when her son misbehaved at school.

McDonogh 32 Literacy Academy officials made Brimmer and her seventh-grader report for Saturday detention at a nearby high school after he cursed out an adult in November. Then, before he began serving a detention of about four hours, they made her pay $25.

She’s not defending her son.

This story was originally published by The Lens, an independent, nonprofit newsroom serving New Orleans.

Published in New Orleans News
Tulane group launching music website
Sunday, 20 April 2014 18:00

Music Rising at Tulane, a program founded by U2’s The Edge, music producer Bob Ezrin and others to preserve the musical cultures of the Gulf South after Hurricane Katrina, will launch a new website Wednesday. The launch is scheduled for 1 p.m. at the Wilson Center Atrium on the Tulane University campus.

The site will feature original content, artists’ biographies and instructional programs to increase the study of Gulf South music cultures among schoolchildren and scholars.

Published in New Orleans News

It was a man with sharp cheekbones and white-blonde hair, wearing a tan cowboy hat and a brown fringed-leather jacket, who revealed the source of Margot Tenenbomb’s freakish forearm power.

“Crew,” he said, his gaze distant and lips pursed as if he were on the verge of whistling. “She did a stint of crew in college.”

Tenenbomb, whose real name remained a mystery, was one of eight competitors who faced off Saturday night in the New Orleans Ladies Arm Wrestling Champion Super Brawl II, a delirium of brute strength, biceps-flexing and theatrical hijinks held at the Art Club in Faubourg Marigny.

Published in New Orleans News
Legislators to debate sale of raw milk
Sunday, 20 April 2014 16:47

In a state that nurtures young chefs and generally exalts eating, Louisiana has been slow to adopt the national trend toward local and organic food.

That’s not to say that the farmers’ markets are not popular. From Main Street in Baton Rouge to Magazine Street in New Orleans and from Foreman Street in Lafayette to Covington, Slidell and Gretna, community markets are crowded Saturday mornings with people buying fresh, locally grown vegetables, fruits, meats and seafoods, usually produced and sold by the farmer and his family.

Published in Baton Rouge News
Some question price of Jazz Fest tickets
Sunday, 20 April 2014 16:46

Mary Stieffel hasn’t missed a day of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival in about six years.

She also hasn’t bought a ticket to the event in all that time. Instead, she works as a volunteer, reaping the reward of two weekends of free entertainment.

“I would not ever, ever spend all that money,” said Stieffel, who works in broadcasting. “It’s just gotten to be too much money, money, money, in my opinion.”

After holding steady last year, the price of Jazz Fest tickets has inched up again this year.

Published in New Orleans News
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