Louisiana News & politics focus on Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards and Louisiana legislature

With the state’s significant fiscal problems, some legislators are looking to eliminate the state’s film tax credits. This would be a huge mistake for the state; however, it seems some legislators are unaware of the benefits of the program that started in 2002. Since that time, thousands of film, TV and video productions have been made in Louisiana, giving our state worldwide exposure worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

Published in News

filmby Mike Malak

The most profound argument in favor of retaining Louisiana’s Motion Picture production tax incentive is the claim that, if eliminated, or modified, Tom Cruise won’t come to the State anymore. I wouldn’t either! A cap on incentives for performer salaries exceeding $1,000,000.00, per production, sounds awfully discriminatory to the Hollywood mind and a backhanded slap at the rich and famous. Not that Cruise was going to come, anyway, which he might, but not for the free money, instead, more likely, for the scenery, food, and all that jazz.

Published in Latest Buzz

filmThere are more films and TV shows in Louisiana than in any location in the world. This incredible climb has occurred in slightly over a decade since the advent of the tax incentive program.

Published in Latest Buzz

filmFilms in Louisiana are BIG BUSINESS with top names in the industry now that the state is considered the state with the most filming worldwide.

Here is the “225.342.FILM”, which is the official hotline of Louisiana Entertainment. Here’s what’s happening as of the 2nd week in August 2014.

Published in Latest Buzz

benjamin-buttonThe Louisiana film industry has matured and is doing better than ever.

 

Published in Latest Buzz
  • A July 4th Fact of Facts: America is Land of Immigrants
  • Poll: Trump strong on jobs, weak on tweets, viewed as reckless, thin-skinned, sexist
  • President Trump, It doesn't feel like Independence Day
  • YIPPIE! The naked truth about free speech, cherished especially on Independence Day

mass2On July 4, 1778, George Washington doubled liquor rations for the soldiers quartered in Princeton, NJ, as a way to celebrate Independence Day. It’s fitting, therefore, that the Fourth of July is America's top-selling beer holiday, according to the Beer Institute. It estimated, in 2013, that sales of beer on the 4th could total $1 billion, doubtlessly higher today. “In moderation,” claims a CA brewery investor, Grover McKean, “beer is tasty and healthy.” Who could disagree?

Read More

joe mikaAs Donald Trump faces the top world leaders this week, including a face-time with Vladimir Putin, and as his healthcare proposals face an uphill climb, his poll numbers for how the nation views him could be better.

According to a morning Consult/Politico poll released Wednesday morning, his tweets, including that against MSNBC's Mika Brzezinski, and his personality are not helping him, at all.

Read More

indy dayII know the calendar says we are approaching the 4th of July, but, it just doesn’t feel like Independence Day.

Perhaps it should.  It’s hot as heck.  The airlines have been packed. The hot dogs are ready for grilling.  The umps are saying, "play ball". The patriotic activities are scheduled. The fireworks are ready-for-blasting. 

Yet, it just doesn’t feel like independence day.

Read More

bill rights2To President Thomas Jefferson, July 4th celebrated more than the signing of the Declaration of Independence. He thought it was a link to the future. The message prominent colonists sent to King George III led to the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, the initial and most prominent feature of which is the First Amendment that guarantees free speech. It’s part of the country’s fundamental essence that each man and woman can say what they feel about government, or anything else, proving President Donald Trump needs some civics lessons.

Read More

latter-blum2

Dead Pelican

Optimized-DeadPelican2 1 1