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Louisiana News & politics focus on Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards and Louisiana legislature

What’s in a name?
    With all the hullabaloo taking place in the Big Easy over Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s support of removing Confederate monuments comes a revealing study from the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC).
    The study found that there are at least 1,503 symbols of the Confederacy in public places across the country, mostly in the Deep South.
    In SPLC’s report, entitled “Whose Heritage?  Public Symbols of the Confederacy,” it notes that symbols that honor the Confederacy can be found on flags; city, county (parish) and school names; lakes, dams and other public works; and state holidays.

Published in News

After six years of surging crime and a declining police force, New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu will finally address the issue of violence at a speech tomorrow night at Dixon Hall on the Tulane campus.

Ironically, the Mayor will speak on a campus named after Paul Tulane, the largest donor to the Confederate States of America. Tulane’s father grew rich utilizing slave labor in Haiti. After Paul Tulane moved to New Orleans, he decided to endow the first university in New Orleans. His wanted his donation to be used for the “promotion and encouragement of intellectual moral and industrial education among the white young persons in the City of New Orleans.”

Published in News

It now appears that Louisiana’s 2016-17 budget shortfall is slightly better than once projected, or at least by roughly 1/5th. 
According to Commissioner of Administration Jay Dardenne the gap that was thought to be about $750 million will be less, courtesy of the Medicaid Expansion of the Affordable Care Act.  

Published in News

Much has been written about the impact of the confederate monument issue and the defeat of the recent New Orleans millage for police and firemen.
The argument goes like this—Mitch Landrieu is unpopular among whites in New Orleans especially due to his recent actions in trying to remove the confederate statues, such as Robert E. Lee, at Lee Circle.

Published in News

State residents may disagree about their favorite sports team or politician, but there is little disagreement about the value of Confederate monuments. The vast majority of Louisiana residents agree that the controversial New Orleans monuments should not be taken down. At least that is the obvious conclusion from a new poll by the LSU Public Policy Research Lab.

Published in News

Today's mailbag:

In today's mailbag, the Louisiana Governor, John Bel Edwards is officially making a request to seek $100 million from the federal government for roads.  A top advisor for tthe Edwards for Governor campaign, Elizabeth Wray, will chair the Women of Distinction luncheon chair and one of the women being honored is former Governor Kathleen Blanco. Mayor Mitch Landrieu has announced the grand opening of a major project on Oretha Castle Haley Blvd, in New Orleans.  The Louisiana Film Festival kicks off today.

Published in News

Despite overwhelming support among the business community and a frenzy of positive coverage in the local media, Mayor Landrieu suffered a major loss at the polls on Saturday for his property tax proposal.

Published in News


Say what?
A day after Bayoubuzz published a column and an audio clip from Jeff Crouere  in which the radio talk show host and Bayoubuzz columnnist suggests that a mileage increase for the police force and firemen is not needed--especially since the city's top cop reportedly claims he doesn't need the money, out from nowhere comes a bombshell.

Published in News

Recording of Police Chief Harrison:   bit.ly/1RWD3sh

In a recording provided by an anonymous source exclusively to Ringside Politics, NOPD Chief Michael Harrison claims that " money is not the problem, or I don't think it is. " The recording took place at a recent meeting in which the Police Chief outlined the needs of his department. 

Published in News

At City Council chambers yesterday, Tulane Professor and Dean of the School of Continuing Studies Richard Marksbury perfectly captured the absurdity of the effort to remove Confederate monuments in New Orleans. He pointed out that using the “poorly written,” “ill-conceived,” and “dangerous” city nuisance ordinance, the statue of Andrew Jackson, at the heart of Jackson Square, the most iconic spot in New Orleans and the most photographed site in the Gulf South, should be removed.

Published in News
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