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In this Nov. 26, 2013, file photo, a doctor speaks to patients in Peoria, Ill.Reuters

The Obama administration is struggling to resolve data discrepancies that could jeopardize coverage for millions who sought health insurance on the federal exchange HealthCare.gov, according to a watchdog report on the still-rocky implementation of ObamaCare. 

Though the system's troubles have faded from the headlines since the problem-plagued launch last October, a report from the health department inspector general provided the first independent look at widespread issues the government is having effectively fact-checking the information applicants are putting in the system.

Published in US NEWS

An Illinois woman who took her fight against one of the nation's most powerful unions all the way to the Supreme Court and won, said all she ever wanted was to care for her ailing son.

Pam Harris, the lead plaintiff in the landmark Harris v. Quinn case, in which the high court ruled people who care for loved ones in their home can't be compelled to join the Service Employees International Union, said the ruling was a victory for her son Josh, who suffers from a rare genetic disorder.

Published in US NEWS

An Illinois woman who took her fight against one of the nation's most powerful unions all the way to the Supreme Court and won, said all she ever wanted was to care for her ailing son.

Pam Harris, the lead plaintiff in the landmark Harris v. Quinn case, in which the high court ruled people who care for loved ones in their home can't be compelled to join the Service Employees International Union, said the ruling was a victory for her son Josh, who suffers from a rare genetic disorder.

Published in US NEWS

Maria Mascone's mom had dementia, and she spent her final six years in an assisted living facility.

The cost of the facility ran about $3,000 a month. Mascone says her dad left behind a sizable nest egg, and eventually the sale of her parents' home helped cover the cost of her mother's care.

Now that her mother has passed away, Mascone, a 62-year-old working in the medical field, says she can't help but think about her own future.

Expanding the number of young adults with health insurance appears to have improved their health and saved them money, according to a new study that is among the first to measure the effect of the healthcare law that President Obama signed four years ago.

Starting in 2010, the Affordable Care Act allowed adults under age 26 to remain on their parents’ health plans, the first coverage expansion to take effect under the law.

New data show the number of students without health insurance on California State University campuses dropped by 60% after Obamacare enrollment, defying concerns that not enough young people would sign up for health insurance.

The Affordable Care Act, the national healthcare law, requires that nearly everyone have insurance in 2014.

The Obama administration has quietly adjusted key provisions of its signature healthcare law to potentially make billions of additional taxpayer dollars available to the insurance industry if companies providing coverage through the Affordable Care Act lose money.

The move was buried in hundreds of pages of new regulations issued late last week. It comes as part of an intensive administration effort to hold down premium increases for next year, a top priority for the White House as the rates will be announced ahead of this fall's congressional elections.

No. 1: The employer mandate

There is no one size fits all on this – variances must be accounted for with small and large companies. For small companies, providing employee health insurance is declining. A mere eight years ago, 63% of employers offered health insurance to their employees.

Today, it’s dropped almost 20% to 44%. Employee benefits experts predict that the decline will drop off at around 25% by the year 2020.

No. 1: The employer mandate

There is no one size fits all on this – variances must be accounted for with small and large companies. For small companies, providing employee health insurance is declining. A mere eight years ago, 63% of employers offered health insurance to their employees. Today, it’s dropped almost 20% to 44%. Employee benefits experts predict that the decline will drop off at around 25% by the year 2020.

Obamacare in California could suffer setbacks, delays and legal challenges if voters this year approve a statewide ballot initiative to regulate insurance rates, a new industry-backed report warns.

Those predictions drew immediate fire from Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones. He said the concerns are nonsense and passage of the ballot measure is essential for consumers to reap the full benefits of the Affordable Care Act.

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