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Monday's Supreme Court ruling on Harris v. Quinn could spur class action suits to recover dues, say experts. (AP)

One of the nation's most powerful labor unions could face a costly onslaught of lawsuits seeking tens of millions of dollars in dues, after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the money was collected improperly, legal experts said.

In a ruling Monday, the high court held that Service Employees International Union cannot force people who care for loved ones to be union members and deduct dues from the government checks of those they care for.

Published in US NEWS

An Illinois woman who took her fight against one of the nation's most powerful unions all the way to the Supreme Court and won, said all she ever wanted was to care for her ailing son.

Pam Harris, the lead plaintiff in the landmark Harris v. Quinn case, in which the high court ruled people who care for loved ones in their home can't be compelled to join the Service Employees International Union, said the ruling was a victory for her son Josh, who suffers from a rare genetic disorder.

Published in US NEWS

An Illinois woman who took her fight against one of the nation's most powerful unions all the way to the Supreme Court and won, said all she ever wanted was to care for her ailing son.

Pam Harris, the lead plaintiff in the landmark Harris v. Quinn case, in which the high court ruled people who care for loved ones in their home can't be compelled to join the Service Employees International Union, said the ruling was a victory for her son Josh, who suffers from a rare genetic disorder.

Published in US NEWS
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    FILE: Walmart blasted New York Times columnist Timothy Egan after a piece in which the retail giant was criticized for paying employees low wages.Walmart.com

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    Dec. 6, 2010: Shopping carts are seen outside a Walmart Supercenter in Coolidge, Arizona.Reuters

Walmart has unleashed a mocking online rebuttal to a New York Times column, providing red "copy editing" responses to columnist Timothy Egan's allegation the chain offered "humiliating" wages to employees and forced them into public assistance.

Published in US NEWS

Maria Mascone's mom had dementia, and she spent her final six years in an assisted living facility.

The cost of the facility ran about $3,000 a month. Mascone says her dad left behind a sizable nest egg, and eventually the sale of her parents' home helped cover the cost of her mother's care.

Now that her mother has passed away, Mascone, a 62-year-old working in the medical field, says she can't help but think about her own future.

Los Angeles Times: State Legislature Tables Bills On Migrant Health Care, Oil Tax, More
Nearly 200 proposals were shelved in the Legislature on Friday, including controversial measures that would have provided health care coverage to people in the country illegally, imposed a tax on oil drilled from the ground and created a voluntary substance-abuse counseling program for doctors (McGreevy and Mason, 5/23).

Hip-Hop-Doctor

Rani G. Whitfield created the massively successful alter ego or moniker, Hip Hop Doc, in order to create a national buzz that would focus on the gross inadequacies and inefficiencies within the American health care system.

His patients in Louisiana and beyond are the beneficiaries because the “Hip Hop Doc” has become a galvanizing brand that has brought together young people and influential people within the medical profession to fight on behalf of the uninsured and underinsured.

BATON ROUGE - After failing to get enough support to try and expand Medicaid coverage in Louisiana, Sen. Ben Nevers (D-Bogalusa) proposed on Wednesday instead that Louisiana implement Governor Bobby Jindal's healthcare model and see if it can work first here in his home state.

"It's not... Read More

A selection of health policy stories from Colorado, Louisiana, Arizona, California, Florida and Michigan.

Health News Colorado: Rate Relief Is Sight For Mountain Resorts
Fending off a potential lawsuit from angry western Colorado residents who face the highest insurance premiums in the nation, Colorado Insurance Commissioner Marguerite Salazar on Friday announced she supports a new health insurance rating map for the state.


The figure is above the Government's target of 7 million. Republicans were against the Act from the beginning and their demand to repeal the law heightened when there were initial hiccups in enrolment. The website showed some technical snags and there were problems during registration in the first few months. All these had demoralised the Democrats who thought the result would directly reflect in the mid-term election in November 2014.
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GNO Inc's Michael Hecht stokes New Orleans region rapid acceleration


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