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Guam team completes Tacloban mission Haiyan survivors struggle to bounce back amid scarce resources

Friday, 06 June 2014 07:13
TACLOBAN, Philippines -- Members of the Guam medical team who recently went on a mission to provide health care to survivors of Supertyphoon Haiyan, here had their own personal stories about why they wanted to help. Doctors who participated said they said they feel fortunate to have thriving practices on Guam, and they wanted to give back to a community that's still struggling to recover more than six months after the storm.
Project Spring Break offers help to Katrina victims
Wednesday, 04 June 2014 00:17
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Chef gives back Louisiana farming community
Tuesday, 03 June 2014 02:17
Celebrity chef John Besh is helping local farmers and entrepreneurs in Lousiana through his charity. Besh and his foundation give small loans for farmers in the post-Hurricane Katrina era. By Maia Reed, Guest blogger / June 4, 2014 Construction on an urban farm proceeds in the Make It Right village in the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans, LA, April 22, 2009.
Study: People fear, more likely to flee, male-named hurricanes more
Monday, 02 June 2014 05:37
WASHINGTON -- Which scares you more: Hurricane Victor or Hurricane Victoria? People are slightly less likely to flee an oncoming storm with a feminine name than a masculine one, a new study finds. But here is Victoria's secret: Hurricanes with feminine names turn out to be deadlier in the United States than their more macho-sounding counterparts, probably because their monikers make people underestimate their danger, the researchers conclude.
Study: People fear male-named hurricanes more
Monday, 02 June 2014 03:00
WASHINGTON — Which scares you more: Hurricane Victor or Hurricane Victoria? People are slightly less likely to flee an oncoming storm with a feminine name than a masculine one, a new study finds. But here is Victoria's secret: Hurricanes with feminine names turn out to be deadlier in the United States than their more macho-sounding counterparts, probably because their monikers make people underestimate their danger, the researchers conclude.
Hurricane Betty or Bob: Does it matter?
Sunday, 01 June 2014 22:24
STORY HIGHLIGHTSFemale-named hurricanes cause "significantly more deaths," a study findsResearchers analyzed over six decades of death rates from U.S. hurricanesExperiment participants considered hypothetical male storms deadlier than female stormsHurricanes used to be given only female names; now, alphabetical lists alternate genders (CNN) -- Apparently sexism isn't just a social problem -- if you're in the path of a hurricane, gender bias might actually kill you.
Study: Female hurricane names could cause more deaths
Sunday, 01 June 2014 13:12
NEW YORK (Reuters) - Would more residents of New Orleans have evacuated ahead of Hurricane Katrina in 2005 if it had been named Kurt? A study published on Monday suggests they would have, perhaps reducing Katrina's death toll of more than 1,800. Because people unconsciously think a storm with a female name is less dangerous than one with a masculine name, those in its path are less likely to flee, and are therefore more vulnerable…
Study says weak hurricane names could cause more deaths| Photos
Sunday, 01 June 2014 12:02
NEW YORK (Reuters) - Would more residents of New Orleans have evacuated ahead of Hurricane Katrina in 2005 if it had been named Kurt? A study published on Monday suggests they would have, perhaps reducing Katrina's death toll of more than 1,800. Because people unconsciously think a storm with a female name is less dangerous than one with a masculine name, those in its path are less likely to flee, and are therefore more vulnerable…
Study: Weak hurricane names could cause more deaths
Sunday, 01 June 2014 11:22
NEW YORK (Reuters) - Would more residents of New Orleans have evacuated ahead of Hurricane Katrina in 2005 if it had been named Kurt? A study published on Monday suggests they would have, perhaps reducing Katrina's death toll of more than 1,800. Because people unconsciously think a storm with a female name is less dangerous than one with a masculine name, those in its path are less likely to flee, and are therefore more vulnerable…
What's in a (hurricane) name? More deaths
Sunday, 01 June 2014 10:00
NEW YORK - Would more residents of New Orleans have evacuated ahead of Hurricane Katrina in 2005 if it had been named Kurt? A study published on Monday suggests they would have, perhaps reducing Katrina's death toll of more than 1,800. Because people unconsciously think a storm with a female name is less dangerous than one with a masculine name, those in its path are less likely to flee, and are therefore more vulnerable to…
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