Louisiana News & politics focus on Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards and Louisiana legislature
Lou Gehrig Burnett

Lou Gehrig Burnett

Lou Gehrig Burnett is the publisher of Fax-Net, a North-Louisiana newsletter.

   jindal-difference  It’s nail-biting time for Louisiana’s Republican Gov. Bobby Jindal.  Will he or won’t he?
    We’re speaking, of course, of whether presumptive GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney will select Jindal as his vice presidential running mate.

 

high-noonThe battle within the Louisiana Republican Party over Ron Paul delegates to the national convention continues and is headed for a showdown before the Republican National Committee.
Ron Paul supporters are gearing up to challenge the entire slate of 46 delegates selected by state GOP leaders, who support Mitt Romney.
The Louisiana Republican Party last week submitted its slate of delegates to the party’s national convention, filling slots that backers of Ron Paul won at the tumultuous state convention with supporters of Romney.

 

    
    Health reform A 50-state survey by USA Today shows that only Republican governors are refusing to expand Medicaid following the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling that the Affordable Care Act was constitutional, but said that states could not be penalized if they don’t enlarge the program.
    Louisiana Republican Gov. Bobby Jindal was the first governor in the nation to announce that he would not participate.  Since then, six other Republicans have joined him and 22 other Republicans say they are in doubt, according to the survey.
    Together, those 29 Republican governors represent nearly 10 million people who were projected to join the program.  On the other hand, 13 Democratic governors say they will fully implement the law, as will the governor of Rhode Island, an Independent.  The remaining 7 Democratic governors are currently studying the program rules.

 


Jindal-smileTVOn the road again

    One political wag put it this way: If the state needs money real bad, why doesn’t it rent out the 4th floor of the state capitol since the governor is never is his office?”  (The governor’s office is on the 4th floor).

    Point taken.  Republican Gov. Bobby Jindal is on the road again.  This time, he is one of two vice presidential wannabes joining presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s campaign on his bus, following  President Obama’ bus around several states.

louisiana capitol 2Remember Cynthia Bridges?  She was head of the Louisiana Department of Revenue under three governors.  
    But apparently Gov. Bobby Jindal urged her to resign after she implemented a law, passed by the Legislature and signed into law by Jindal, that gave a tax break for purchasers of automobiles that use alternative fuels.

vitter-jindalWho will be our next Governor?

Republican Gov. Bobby Jindal is term-limited and cannot seek a third term, and the next governor’s election is not until 2015, but that hasn’t stopped visions of being the state’s chief executive from dancing in many wannabe heads.

The list of candidates will, obviously, be a long one since it is an open seat. Republicans are hoping to hold on to the most powerful governor’s office in the country, while Democrats are hoping to take back the office it has dominated for past decades.

So, who wants to be governor of Louisiana? At the top of the list of potential candidates, it appears, is Democrat John Georges, a wealthy New Orleans businessman. He asked renowned pollster Dr. Verne Kennedy of Market Research Insight (MRI) to do a poll to test the political waters in the state.

scapegoatSay it ain’t so!

Republican Gov. Bobby Jindal – often referred to by detractors as the little dictator – has struck again. He has put another notch on his vindictive gun, punishing a state legislator who dared to disagree with him on a legislative issue.
This time, it is one of our northwest Louisiana state representatives, Republican Jim Morris of Oil City, who was stripped of his position as vice chairman of the House Natural Resources and Environment Committee.

legislature jvlastnews thumbKeep talking and driving...
    Although it’s dangerous, Louisianians who are addicted to talking on their cell phones while driving can keep on keeping on.  The bill that would have made using a hand-held device while driving a primary offense has died in the state Senate.
    It passed the House of Representatives with flying colors, but two senators of the Senate Transportation Committee voted against the measure.  Only one other member of the committee was present, who voted for the bill.

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